Research & Publications

Dissertation

“Education Bulge: How Poor Returns to Higher Education Influence Mass Protest Onset and Outcomes”.

In many authoritarian regimes, the government is the primary employer and public sector positions are lucrative and secure. Public sector positions are staffed by highly skilled workers, who are often educated and trained at state-run universities. My research shows that when government is both the main provider of higher education and the main employer of skilled labor, the public in general, and university graduates in particular, come to see government as responsible for all forms of employment, both private and public. Shrinkages in the job market during periods of rapid higher education growth, or an education bulge, may prompt mass anti-governmental protests. During an education bulge, university educated workers that face declining college premiums may seek out semi and unskilled positions, displacing and replacing employees with less education. Large-scale “downshifting” of skilled labor due to an education bulge has strongly negative downstream effects upon labor configurations and wages, inducing society-wide grievance. Education bulges encourage the emergence and success of mass protests in previously impervious authoritarian regimes.

Supported by:  Diversifying Higher Education Faculty (DFI), Adam Smith Fellowship 

Working Papers 

“Why Don’t People of Color Attend Conferences?”

An examination of individual, conference, and institutional barriers to conference attendance and participation. The research seeks to explain the factors that inhibit minority involvement as well as identify ways in which the professional political science organizations can be more inclusive to people of color and their unique contributions to the field.

“Decomposing Protest Numbers”

In this paper, I examine traditional reporting methods for protests and introduce a new method of decomposing protest pictures into accurate count data

Publications

  •  Turner, Kimberly. 2010. “Breaking the Poverty Traps, Elevating the Poorest of the Poor”. Review of Paul Collier, The Bottom Billion. (New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 2007) for NAFSA: Association of International Educators Review of Global Studies Literature October 2010, no.2.
  • Turner, Kimberly. 2010. “From Victim to Victor: Documenting the Struggles and Triumphs of Women of the Third World”. Review of Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl Wu Dunn, Half the Sky (New York, New York: Alfred Knoff, 2009) for NAFSA: Association of International Educators Review of Global Studies Literature October 2010, no.2.
  • Turner, Kimberly. 2010. “Peter Hayden: Sea Power and maritime strategy in the 21st century”. American Review of Canadian Studies: Volume 31, Issue 3, October 2001.

Conference Presentations

  • “The Education Bulge: How Higher Education Attainment Drives Protest Onset and Outcomes.” Midwest Political Science Association annual meeting, April 2019
  • Turner, Kimberly and Emily Stacy. “Why Don’t People of Color Attend Conferences?” American Political Science Association annual meeting, August 2018 and MPSA annual conference 2018.
  • “Why Hong Kong? Protest, Success, and Resistance in The Face of Overwhelming Odds”. Junior Scholar Symposium: Popular Mobilization and Democratization. Midwest Political Science Association annual meeting, April 2018.
  • “Hong Kong: A Success in the Making.” Southern Political Science Association annual meeting, January 2018.
  •  “The Return of Radical Student Group”. Midwest Political Science Association annual meeting, April 2015
  • “Education as a Security Threat”. Southern Political Science Association annual meeting, January 2015.
  •  “The Unwashed Masses: Does Education Provoke Revolution?” Midwest Political Science Association annual meeting, April 2013 and the canceled American Political Science Association annual meeting, New Orleans 2012.
  • Turner, Kimberly and Emily O’Neal, “Opportunities and Challenges in Teaching Research Methods in a General Education Course at a Community College.” American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, February 2011.

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